Regardless of the origin of the name, the caveman diet has many of the same principles as the paleo diet. It’s focused primarily on the consumption of higher quantities of real, unprocessed, non-packaged food that cavemen could have eaten thousands of years ago, before Safeway, Walmart, and all of the other mega-super-duper-grocery stores we have available in today’s world came into being. Here are the basics:
This cookbook is a little franker than most, which isn’t that obvious from the cover. In particular, you’ll find the odd expletive in place and much of the writing is more conversational than other cookbooks. To me, this makes for a fun book, especially as it also has many stunning photos of the food that you’ll be making. But, some people simply don’t like the approach.
This flatbread pizza is billed as being grain free and nut free, which is interesting because many Paleo pizza crusts will contain almond flour to replace ordinary flour. This recipe uses sunflower seed flour, a very unique choice for a white flour substitute, and it combines that with tapioca flour to live up to the nut-free promise. You are free to add your own toppings, or go with what they’ve used, including fresh tomatoes, spinach leaves, and season things up with oregano, basil, and garlic powder. It’s nice to have a guilt-free delicious flatbread crust recipe to have on-hand anytime you get a pizza craving.
Nom Nom Paleo: Food for Humans takes a humorous approach to the positive lifestyle of a Paleo diet. The book contains more than one hundred "nomtastic memories" for anyone looking to extend their Paleo recipe repertoire. Written by authors Michelle Tam and Henry Fong - an accomplished husband-and-wife duo, the Nom Nom Paleo cookbook has received many awards for its five-star recipes.

1. One Pan Balsamic Chicken and Veggies: This super healthy and nutritious meal features chicken breasts and the veggies of your choice, all topped with a delicious balsamic and Italian dressing. Pro tip: As with all of these recipes, make sure to wait until you’re ready to eat before you add any glazes or dressings on top. (via Chelsea’s Messy Apron)


The author presented the facts logically and the book felt well researched. The recipes were varied and easy to execute. I've looked through a lot of Paleo cookbooks, so it's not often I come across much that is truly unique, but this cookbook had quite a few recipes I hadn't found versions of before! The meals look easy to make and the diet as a whole is presented in such a way that it doesn't feel intimidating. While I do not intend to adopt a complete paleo diet, I do intend to incorporate several of the concepts and make more of the recipes. And I would definitely recommend this book for anyone wanting to start eating paleo or who wants to add more recipes to their diet. I only wish this book came with beautiful color pictures. A cookbook without pictures or with very little pictures is kind of boring to me. First you eat with your eyes, then you eat with your stomach ;)
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