These pork chops are some of the best we’ve seen, and it is through a combination of preparing the pork chop correctly, and topping it with a delicious fruit slaw. When choosing the pork for your pork chops, you want to make sure that you go with an organic brand, rather than conventional. This is true with all of the meat you purchase for Paleo meals because it won’t be loaded with antibiotics, and the animals will have been fed organic feed. For the fruit in this, you’re also going to want to stick with organic peaches, plums, and apricots to avoid chemicals and pesticides.

Not paleo specifically, but this gorgeously designed book is full of plant-forward recipes that are either Whole30-compliant already or require a little bit of adaptation to fit into the plan. At any rate, I always welcome extra inspiration when it comes to vegetables, so I love paging through this one. The photography and design is really stunning and makes me want to eat zucchini ribbons all day. Buy it here.
The dressing steals the show on this salad, but you don’t want to overlook the roasted pumpkin. Pumpkin is an often overlooked vegetable that only gets popular in the fall, but is full of vitamins, minerals, and fiber that makes it a healthy part of any meal all year long. Roasting it softens it up properly so it is pleasing to the tooth, and the dressing that accompanies it on this recipe is pretty special. The peculiar thing is that it’s very simple, consisting of just five ingredients: olive oil, orange juice, herbs, and salt and pepper. Be sure to use sea salt and not refined salt.
If you're following a paleo diet, or even if you're just wanting to try something new, these paleo dishes are a great way to dive right in to a healthy lifestyle. Paleo recipes feature zero grains, dairy (besides clarified butter), legumes, or processed foods. Paleo foods are considered wholesome, healthy, and usually feature a nice portion of meat nestled in with some veggies. Dig right in with these exceptional paleo-approved dishes. 
Shakshuka, a traditional Israeli breakfast food, is a skillet of spiced tomatoes, peppers, and onions with baked eggs. In this version, we swapped out our trusted cast-iron skillet for the walls of a spaghetti squash boat to create a paleo-friendly morning meal. Spaghetti squash adds a creamy texture and sweet flavor to this low-carb spin on a breakfast hash. Sprinkled with fresh cilantro, this hearty breakfast option is perfect for a brunch crowd or a lazy weekend morning in bed.
A very hot oven quickly roasts the potatoes and finishes the chicken without overcooking. The simple oil mixture, using solely extra-virgin olive oil to keep it paleo-friendly, packs a ton of flavor without adding excessive calories or fat to an already flavorful dinner. To serve a family, double the recipe and use an additional sheet pan for added space. You can substitute fingerling potatoes, halved lengthwise, for the small Yukon gold potatoes.

The dressing steals the show on this salad, but you don’t want to overlook the roasted pumpkin. Pumpkin is an often overlooked vegetable that only gets popular in the fall, but is full of vitamins, minerals, and fiber that makes it a healthy part of any meal all year long. Roasting it softens it up properly so it is pleasing to the tooth, and the dressing that accompanies it on this recipe is pretty special. The peculiar thing is that it’s very simple, consisting of just five ingredients: olive oil, orange juice, herbs, and salt and pepper. Be sure to use sea salt and not refined salt.
Stack these bacon breakfast sandwiches nice and tall and you’ll have a formidable breakfast you’ll want to slow down for. The key is starting with a Paleo-approved bread and using thick cut bacon. Cutting the bacon nice and thick gives it a different quality than typical breakfast bacon and you’ll get more meaty flavor in each bite. Top the bacon with an egg, and add in some fresh spinach so you’re getting a serving of veggies too.
More than a little into running and paleo recipes (yoga now too!) but I'm not here to rain on your grains (or anything else) so come along for the ride! I do a little too much of everything (except cleaning), and I enjoy laughing at myself. As long as I'm the one making the jokes, that is. Just kidding. So bring me your angst, your appetite and your frying pan and climb aboard!
Description: A decadent, yet healthy, selection of over 65 crave-worthy recipes – each one more delicious than the last! Pancakes, crackers, pizza, lasagna, eggplant parmesan, fried fish, cakes, pies, ice cream and so much more! You won’t believe that you can eat these delicious foods, all while dropping weight faster than you ever thought possible!
These apple chips are baked, not fried, so you’re already coming out on top compared to eating a bag of potato chips. Since you won’t be eating potatoes on Paleo it’s good to come up with a better alternative. These apple chips will have a sweetness to them, satisfying both your crunchy cravings as well as your sweet tooth. The best part is they only use two ingredients, apples and cinnamon, so there’s never any doubt as to whether these are healthy or not. Paleo isn’t very fruit centric, but you should be having at least one serving of fruit per day, and this can be it.
They’ve taken the approach of using meat to replace the crust of the pizza, which cuts out the grains and makes this one meaty pizza pie. The crust is made from Italian sausage, so it’s going to be massively flavorful, and a little spicey. They recommend using a sugar-free pizza sauce, which on Paleo you don’t want to eat any refined sugar, so this is a good recommendation to follow. They’ve made sure to include a bunch of vegetables in this “meatizza” so you are still going to get your nutritional needs met, in addition to all of that meat.

This book is particularly geared towards entertaining friends and family with stunning Paleo meals that they might not even know are Paleo. The typical problem presents itself that you want to entertain, but you don’t want to sacrifice your progress by eating a bunch of foods that aren’t Paleo friendly. The answer is to cater your own Paleo approved foods, and this recipe guide shows you how to make foods that everyone will enjoy, regardless of whether or not they share your Paleo philosophy. It has everything from a full dinner party to just a casual get together. Become a master Paleo host with this guide.
At some point on the Paleo diet you’re going to crave something sweet, flavorful, and crunchy, and that’s when we’d recommend baking up a batch of these clusters. They use pumpkin seeds, and we’re just finding out how healthy these are, and the benefits they provide. The sweetness comes from coconut sugar and honey, two approved sources of sweet on Paleo. We recommend going with organic raw honey to avoid the processed kind you find on store shelves. The other ingredients are all-natural, just be sure to use organic pumpkin seeds for the best results.
In many ways, the most interesting thing about this cookbook isn’t the recipes but the other information that is provided. With this cookbook, the authors strongly focus helping people to transition to the paleo diet and then stick with it in the long-term. This type of information can be particularly useful because the paleo diet is often overwhelming, especially when people first get involved.
The dressing steals the show on this salad, but you don’t want to overlook the roasted pumpkin. Pumpkin is an often overlooked vegetable that only gets popular in the fall, but is full of vitamins, minerals, and fiber that makes it a healthy part of any meal all year long. Roasting it softens it up properly so it is pleasing to the tooth, and the dressing that accompanies it on this recipe is pretty special. The peculiar thing is that it’s very simple, consisting of just five ingredients: olive oil, orange juice, herbs, and salt and pepper. Be sure to use sea salt and not refined salt.

The author presented the facts logically and the book felt well researched. The recipes were varied and easy to execute. I've looked through a lot of Paleo cookbooks, so it's not often I come across much that is truly unique, but this cookbook had quite a few recipes I hadn't found versions of before! The meals look easy to make and the diet as a whole is presented in such a way that it doesn't feel intimidating. While I do not intend to adopt a complete paleo diet, I do intend to incorporate several of the concepts and make more of the recipes. And I would definitely recommend this book for anyone wanting to start eating paleo or who wants to add more recipes to their diet. I only wish this book came with beautiful color pictures. A cookbook without pictures or with very little pictures is kind of boring to me. First you eat with your eyes, then you eat with your stomach ;)
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