According to reviewers, Paleo in 28 is a good starter guide for eliminating processed foods from your diet. Many say it has helpful guides on basic paleo principles and reviewers note that the meals are delicious, too. A few people say that the shopping guides aren’t the best, but overall, this paleo cookbook is a helpful resource if you’re just starting out on the diet.
This flatbread pizza is billed as being grain free and nut free, which is interesting because many Paleo pizza crusts will contain almond flour to replace ordinary flour. This recipe uses sunflower seed flour, a very unique choice for a white flour substitute, and it combines that with tapioca flour to live up to the nut-free promise. You are free to add your own toppings, or go with what they’ve used, including fresh tomatoes, spinach leaves, and season things up with oregano, basil, and garlic powder. It’s nice to have a guilt-free delicious flatbread crust recipe to have on-hand anytime you get a pizza craving.
A paleo diet promotes high-protein recipes with responsibly raised, antibiotic- and hormone-free meats and poultry, and wild-caught, sustainably sourced seafood. Good fat comes in as a close second, with sources like nuts, seeds, coconut oil, avocado oil, and extra virgin olive oil as excellent choices. Vegetables are also key, as long as they're not too starchy. Avoid white potatoes, but most fresh veggies are fair game.

You can still enjoy all the taste of a juicy, veggie-topped burger without any of the excess calories due to a thick bun or heavy mayo-based sauce. This paleo salad features a hearty burger patty, fresh lettuce and tomatoes, and an herb-y vinaigrette to drizzle atop. We love the richness that a little ground lamb offers, but you can use all beef or even ground turkey instead.
3. Paleo Butternut Sausage Bake With Kale: Featuring butternut squash, pork sausage, kale, and marinara sauce, this delicious combination of flavors goes into one cast-iron skillet before getting popped in the oven to bake for about 30 minutes. You’ll have to roast the squash for 30 minutes too, so this bad boy takes a total of about one hour of prep time. WORTH IT. (via Paleo Running Mama)
As some of you know, I worked for Laura Fuentes at MOMables last summer. I like to say she gave me the “Blogging for Dummies” course. She had it down, but she needed an intern and I wanted to learn. It was such a fun experience, and now whenever I’m in town I must visit for Bulletproof Coffee or a Paleo treat together. We both love healthy food, blogging, and coffee. A lot. 
You might have heard about the paleo diet by now — a way to eat based on how our hunter-gatherer ancestors (read: cavemen) did it back in the day. While going paleo eliminates some tasty modern options like breads, pastas, and other grains, along with legumes, dairy, and soy, it emphasizes other delectable, whole foods that provide various health benefits.

As pictured, these short ribs represent a perfectly portioned Paleo meal, because you’re getting nice a serving of vegetables along with your beef. Short ribs can be tough to cook, and often take a long time roasting or grilling, but she’s broken it down so that it’s a relatively easy recipe, and it’ll come out tasting great. She’s got them rested on top of a portabella mushroom cap, and served up with a side of broccoli, so this is not only a beefy meal, it’s also vegetable centric. Try these off the bone short ribs, and you’ll be hooked.
Sweet potatoes will likely become one of the foods you find yourself using a lot of when eating Paleo. That’s because they can be cooked up in so many different ways, and they also serve as a great replacement to white potatoes. In this soup they’ll add a creamy texture, as well as lots of flavor. They go great with bell peppers, and their choice of lemon and thyme can’t be beat. The great part is that they used leftover mashed sweet potatoes for this soup, which takes out a lot of the prep work and lets you get to the cooking and the eating faster.
Stack these bacon breakfast sandwiches nice and tall and you’ll have a formidable breakfast you’ll want to slow down for. The key is starting with a Paleo-approved bread and using thick cut bacon. Cutting the bacon nice and thick gives it a different quality than typical breakfast bacon and you’ll get more meaty flavor in each bite. Top the bacon with an egg, and add in some fresh spinach so you’re getting a serving of veggies too.
The mild flavor of spinach makes it wonderfully adaptable to sizzling garlic and spice from the crushed red pepper. For fullest flavor, cook spinach only until it begins to turn limp. Sautéed spinach can be made in a snap and pairs perfectly with almost every protein. If you have leftover spinach on hand or any wilting leafy greens, sautéing with a little olive oil and garlic instantly brings it back to life. Starting aromatics in a cold skillet lets them infuse the oil. The garlic also has less chance of burning. Let cooked potatoes dry out so they'll be extra crispy in the hash. Leftover cooked potatoes would be even better. Ground chicken has a touch more fat than ground chicken breast, key for more flavorful hash. Serve with Sautéed Spinach with Garlic and Red Pepper.
The author presented the facts logically and the book felt well researched. The recipes were varied and easy to execute. I've looked through a lot of Paleo cookbooks, so it's not often I come across much that is truly unique, but this cookbook had quite a few recipes I hadn't found versions of before! The meals look easy to make and the diet as a whole is presented in such a way that it doesn't feel intimidating. While I do not intend to adopt a complete paleo diet, I do intend to incorporate several of the concepts and make more of the recipes. And I would definitely recommend this book for anyone wanting to start eating paleo or who wants to add more recipes to their diet. I only wish this book came with beautiful color pictures. A cookbook without pictures or with very little pictures is kind of boring to me. First you eat with your eyes, then you eat with your stomach ;)
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