In "The Zenbelly Cookbook," Simone Miller draws on her experience as a chef and caterer to ease the transition to preparing Paleo meals. Besides great insider tips, from choosing the right knife to julienning a carrot, Miller provides a primer on ingredient measurements and an instructive breakdown of recipes. Her family-friendly dishes and refreshing menu ideas make creating a Paleo feast a breeze.

This cod gets dusted with ginger powder, as well as salt and pepper to keep things very simple, but very delicious. As you see it’s served next to a salad made from zucchini which has been spiralized into ribbons, and gets steamed to keep it very healthy. The whole lot is then covered with a blend of vinegar, soy sauce, honey, and sesame oil, so it’s not too dry and is full of flavor. The cod and zucchini go together very well, making this a light meal you can use as a lunch, or dinner.


Dried Fruit Bars Bite-Sized Raspberry Popsicles Apple and Almond Butter Bites Acorn Squash with Walnuts & Cranberries Valentine’s Day Smoothie Bacon-Wrapped Avocado Baked Apple Chips Granola Bars Pumpkin Pie Smoothie Apple cinnamon fruit rolls Chocolate nut granola Morning Paleo smoothie Dark Chocolate Covered Almonds Grilled peaches with Prosciutto and Basil Paleo Snacks Kale chips Raspberry-Lime Fruit Dip Chocolate Strawberry Hearts Banana Raisin Cookies Chunky Fruit Popsicles Bite-sized chocolate treats Broiled Grapefruit Fruit Pudding Fried Honey Banana

Grandmas may have spent hours perfecting their versions of meatballs (and we love 'em for it!), but in these busy times, slaving over a stove may not be on the agenda. Expedite your meatball-making with these breadcrumb-free, baked-not-fried pork and beef spheres, drowned in a homemade marinara sauce. You won’t believe it only takes about 30 minutes for the whole thing to come together.
According to reviewers, Paleo in 28 is a good starter guide for eliminating processed foods from your diet. Many say it has helpful guides on basic paleo principles and reviewers note that the meals are delicious, too. A few people say that the shopping guides aren’t the best, but overall, this paleo cookbook is a helpful resource if you’re just starting out on the diet.

This recipe idea came from her, she has a staple chicken salad recipe that she makes weekly, and we get really creative with 100 million ways we can eat it. After finding these completely Paleo wraps, we decided to stuff them with her chicken salad. It was deeelicious. I love all different kinds of chicken salad. I actually have another Chicken Salad Recipe on my blog, which is a bit more complicated. This one that I’ll share today is much easier and perfect to make each week. 


Is this book 100% squeaky-clean strict Paleo? No. Ultra-strict Paleo templates call for avoidance of salt, extreme reduction in carbohydrate intake, and never eating dairy of any kind. When performance-minded people blindly follow strict Paleo, the rate of failure and abandonment is high. Why? They haven’t properly tailored Paleo principles to their training demands. As such, you’ll see salt, carb-dense veggies and even some full-fat dairy like ghee in some recipes. And, you’ll even see the occasional option for things like whey protein, white potatoes and white rice. These may not be right for every person, but it’s my stance that if these foods are not problematic for you and may help your performance and recovery, they shouldn’t be 100% off the menu forever.

Hey Tessa! Good question. So after calculating from my credit card, I spend about $275 on average on food without really budgeting. I stick to eggs and chicken as my main form of protein and look for when grassfed beef is on sale. Even at $7 a pound I can get about 3 meals out of that, so it’s not too bad. I will probably be doing a post on this in the next few months when I get back to school and am keeping track of exactly how much I spend on what.

Beyond Bacon is not only packed with mouth-watering recipes, but the Paleo Parents also teach us how to find affordable pastured pork and teach us about the nutritional value of including pork in our diets. In addition, I love how the recipes are marked as easy, intermediate and difficult. This book is elegant, informative and would look stunning on your coffee table!
You’d think vegan and paleo sort of cancel each other out, with paleo diet recipes emphasizing grass-fed meats and free-range eggs and vegans avoiding all animal products. But when you think about what our “ancestors” probably really ate, it must have been a very plant-based diet. So, what does an ancestral vegan diet look like? Abundant fruits and veggies are something both eating philosophies have in common. Grains and legumes — go-tos for many vegans — are out, but paleo-friendly starches like sweet potatoes, yams, cassava and plantains are in, and they’re both tasty and filling. So are all the good fats, like nuts, avocados and olive oil. And we can sweeten things up when we need to with fruit juices, honey, molasses, pure maple syrup and dried fruits. This is starting to sound not only healthy, but also deliciously doable. Here are 18 tempting recipes that’ll have you saying: “Let’s do this!”
Don't let your dietary restrictions get in the way of a great party. With "Gather: The Art of Paleo Entertaining," authors Haley Mason and Bill Staley show how to impress uninitiated guests with a multicultural Paleo menu. Dishes like Costillitas (Cuban-style baby back ribs) and General Tso's Chicken are perfect for large family get-togethers, while the recipes can be scaled back to a party of two. Organized by season to ensure the freshest ingredients, the book also offers tips on pulling off an elegant holiday feast.

Making a pizza crust from cauliflower is something you just have to try if you haven’t yet. You’ll be surprised that a vegetable can double as a pizza crust, and even more surprised to learn that it actually tastes good. This pizza makes use of bacon, so it has an unfair advantage on your taste buds. There’s also spinach as a topping, so you’re definitely covered in the vegetable department. Coconut flour helps the cauliflower turn out like a pizza crust, so you won’t be focused on that while you’re eating and you can focus on the bacon.
These gummy orange slices are really great because they don’t use any sugar, but they come out just like a piece of gummy candy, with natural orange flavoring throughout. Gelatin is something that you can definitely have while on the Paleo diet, and they’re making full use of it here. Of course real oranges account for the orange taste, which is a recurring theme with Paleo, it uses natural and basic ingredients to accomplish its flavor goals.You’ll have to decide for yourself if you want to use the food coloring to make this look orange, and if so how orange you want it to be. Paleo purists wouldn’t use any food coloring.
You’ll get over 120 recipes in this highly rated book that shows you how to cook up Paleo food for you as well as your family. If you’ve ever wanted a “diet” where you don’t have to count calories, or eat specially labeled diet foods, Paleo is the way to go and this book is the way to get started. It has information that has been peer reviewed and time tested and is sure to teach you at least something about Paleo that you didn’t know. The recipes are laid out in a manner that is easy to follow, so you’ll be sure to stick with it and learn the right way to do things.
A good ol’ sandwich for lunch? Not if you’re eating paleo! The grain-free paleo diet is based on the human diet from over 10,000 years ago. This means foods that can be hunted or found straight off the tree or vine (no processed snacks here). So what is a paleo-friendly person on their lunch break to do? Here are 20 fantastic, healthy options that will have your non-paleo co-workers kale-green with envy.
I'm a guy, carnivore and amateur cook . I love meat so going Paleo isn't a great stretch for me, but I'm always looking for ways to bump up the flavor and elevate my cooking. What I like about this cookbook is that the recipes are easy to follow. But what I LOVE is the diversity of different cooking styles and meats used. The author takes you on a world wide trip of flavor and introduces you to proteins most people would be nervous to try to cook or eat. While you have your normal proteins such as beef, pork, chicken and lamb, you also get an intro to frog legs, gator, bison, buffalo, venison, elk, etc. Take a walk on the wide side and let your inner Captain Caveman taste buds scream in joy with these tasty and healthy recipes. Good Eats.
This mackerel recipe uses a pound of fresh mackerel with the skin left on. It is advertised as being served with a magic sauce and without taking any of the magic away we can tell you that it’s made with sherry, honey, some vinegar, and fresh ginger so it’s going to taste incredible, without using any ingredients that will set you back on your progress. On Paleo you may see yourself eating more fish than you used to eat, because it is such a healthy meat, and something our ancestors surely would have eaten. They have it served on a bed of cauli-rice, a rice substitute made from cauliflower.
Here’s another complete paleo meal in one “container.” The red bell peppers get cooked to mellow sweetness, but still hold their shape enough to keep other delicious ingredients inside. This recipe, with its peppers and tomatoes, is a great source of vitamins A and C, even after the vitamin loss that cooking causes. It’s also a good source of protein (4 ounces of lean turkey has over 20 grams).
Shakshuka, a traditional Israeli breakfast food, is a skillet of spiced tomatoes, peppers, and onions with baked eggs. In this version, we swapped out our trusted cast-iron skillet for the walls of a spaghetti squash boat to create a paleo-friendly morning meal. Spaghetti squash adds a creamy texture and sweet flavor to this low-carb spin on a breakfast hash. Sprinkled with fresh cilantro, this hearty breakfast option is perfect for a brunch crowd or a lazy weekend morning in bed.
You’ll be happy to learn that you can have Thai curry on the Paleo diet, as long as you follow a recipe that’s been adjusted accordingly. This may not follow the traditional recipe exactly, but all of the distinct flavors are there, thanks to the use of full-fat coconut milk. They’ve used plenty of chicken, and have included an assortment of vegetables like zucchini, carrots, mushrooms, and asparagus. There’s even kale thrown in for even more nutrients. Really as long as you’ve got the curry paste and the coconut milk you’re well on your way to a successful replication.

This is a Fruit Roll-Up knock off that will give you a serving of actual fruit rather than a bunch of artificial ingredients and commercial sweeteners. The cool thing is she uses three different types of fruit in these, with apples, strawberries, and grapefruit making an appearance. Making it look like a strip of leather is easier than you think, and she walks you through the steps so you can make it look appetizing. And they’re great for kid’s lunches as well, so you can feel good about what they are snacking on.
Eggs are an excellent foundation for paleo breakfasts. Over easy, scrambled, poached, baked, hard-boiled, soft-boiled, made into an omelet—you name it. You can also experiment with paleo pancakes, using protein powder, coconut flour, or almond flour in lieu of white flour (tip: add baking soda and vinegar for a fluffier outcome). Chia puddings, sweet potato "toast," and paleo-friendly smoothies are also fair game.
Not paleo specifically, but this gorgeously designed book is full of plant-forward recipes that are either Whole30-compliant already or require a little bit of adaptation to fit into the plan. At any rate, I always welcome extra inspiration when it comes to vegetables, so I love paging through this one. The photography and design is really stunning and makes me want to eat zucchini ribbons all day. Buy it here.
Get into the habit of buying a butternut squash whenever you’re at the store. They’re so versatile and able to be used in so many ways, that you’ll have no trouble finding a Paleo friendly recipe to use it in. Here she’ll show you exactly how to take that big bulky squash and tame it so it becomes a tasty soup. If you’ve always avoided these types of squash because you didn’t know how to prepare it, now’s your chance to learn how, and it will be a skill you can use again and again when eating on the Paleo plan.
This beef recipe is simple, but comes out delicious because of the way it is prepared. You get plenty of beef in the form of chuck roast, and it is recommended to use grass-fed beef in this recipe as well as any other beef recipe you follow while eating Paleo. It’s also using a few glasses of red wine, and a good portion of tomato paste. If you are concerned about the red wine, don’t worry, the alcohol burn away during the cooking process, leaving just the flavor behind. Between the resveratrol in the red wine, and the lycopene in the tomatoes, you are getting a very healthy meal here.
The paleo diet encourages you to skip weighing and measuring yourself and if at all encourages you to count nutrients as opposed to calories. So the only thing you should take into consideration when meal planning is making sure you’ll approximately cover your macronutrient needs and then simply eat as much as you feel like when it’s breakfast, lunch or dinner time.
I am doing a low carbohydrate (but not totally Paleo) diet. There are a lot of great recipes in this book. I've already made about half a dozen of the meat dishes, several of the veggies and a dessert. The book is well laid out and truly has a wide variety of types of dishes. I've purchased several of these types of cookbooks, and by far this one is the best. Several co-workers have already ordered their own after looking through mine.
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